Artist Talks

HEMPHILL Presents: Alma Thomas: A Conversation about Alma Thomas and her Influence

Alma Thomas, Untitled, circa 1968, acrylic on paper, 18” x 52”. Courtesy of HEMPHILL.

Alma Thomas, Untitled, circa 1968, acrylic on paper, 18” x 52”. Courtesy of HEMPHILL.

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Artist Talk: Saturday, December 13 at 10am

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Seating is limited and available on a first-come first-served basis.

In conjuction with the exhibition ALMA THOMAS: Thirteen Studies for Paintings, this talk will explore the significance and impact of Alma Thomas’ creative process. Panelists include contemporary artists, scholars, and museum professionals whose work has centered around or been influenced by Alma Thomas.

Endia Beal is a North Carolina based artist, educator and activist who is internationally known for her photographic narratives and video testimonies that examine the personal, yet contemporary stories of minority women working within the corporate space. Beal currently serves as the Interim Director of the Diggs Gallery and is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Art at Winston-Salem State University.

Steven Cushner is a painter who has lived and worked in Washington DC since 1978. His abstract forms and repetitive mark making evoke the tradition of patterned abstraction formed by Thomas’ work of the 1970s. Cushner is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and received his Master of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Maryland in 1980. His work is included in numerous private and public collections, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC, and the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT.

David Hart is the author of articles in the Encyclopedia of Race and Racism (2013) and SAGE Encyclopedia of Identity (2010), and several essays in exhibition catalogues on African-American and contemporary Cuban art including Inside/Outside: Contemporary Cuban Art at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC (2003). He is currently conducting research on his uncle, Harold R. Hart, who was director of the Martha Jackson Gallery in New York and a close friend of Alma Thomas.

Kelly Quinn is the Terra Foundation Project Manager for Online Scholarly Education Initiatives at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She has published essays on the lives of artists and architects and the meanings of public housing and memorials. She is currently writing a biography of Hilyard R. Robinson, an African American architect who lived and worked in Washington, D.C. Her primary research interests are in African American cultural history and the uses of storytelling in everyday life. Quinn holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Maryland.

This event is in conjunction with the exhibition, Alma Thomas: Thirteen Studies for Paintings, on view through December 20, 2014.

Gallery Hours:

  • Tuesday–Saturday, 10am–5pm
  • and by appointment

HEMPHILL is located at 1515 14th Street NW. For more information visit www.hemphillfinearts.com.

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Editorial Team
Authored by: Editorial Team

Post provided by the East City Art Editorial Team.