ECA Art News Briefs

ECA Art News Briefs
Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann Awarded Bethesda Painting Award “Best in Show”

Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann Awarded Bethesda Painting Award “Best in Show”

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District announced the top three Bethesda Painting Awards prize winners on Wednesday evening during the exhibition’s opening at Gallery B. Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann of Washington, DC.was awarded “Best in Show” with $10,000; Carolyn Case of Cockeysville, MD was named second place and was given $2,000 and Kenneth Schiano of Chestertown, MD received (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
Dewberry to Receive the Jinx Hazel Arts Award

Dewberry to Receive the Jinx Hazel Arts Award

Dewberry will receive the Jinx Hazel Arts Award at the Arts Council of Fairfax County’s sixth annual Arts Awards on October 20, 2017. Dewberry will be honored for its ongoing support of the arts, education, and contributions to engineering, planning and design in Fairfax County.

Dewberry is recognized as one of the top engineering and design firms in the Greater Washington, DC, region and nationally. In addition to (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
Nine New Acquisitions Celebrate National Museum of Women in the Arts’ 30th Anniversary Year

Nine New Acquisitions Celebrate National Museum of Women in the Arts’ 30th Anniversary Year

The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) announces recent major collection acquisitions in celebration of the beginning of the museum’s 30th-anniversary year. Newly acquired works by Yael Bartana, Berthe Morisot and Faith Ringgold are currently on view in the museum’s collection galleries, and works by Louise Bourgeois and Lalla Essaydi will be on view in REVIVAL, an exhibition of contemporary sculpture, photography and video, from June 23 to Sept. 10, 2017.

“We are delighted to have strong support from generous donors and members who made these acquisitions possible. Their contributions have enabled us to add new, diverse and increasingly global artworks to the collection—from late 19th century painting to contemporary times,” said NMWA Director Susan Fisher Sterling. “These important acquisitions greatly enrich the thematic reinstallation of our collection galleries for the museum’s 30th anniversary.”

New Acquisitions:

Louise Bourgeois, Spider III, 1995; Bronze, 19 x 33 x 33 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Wilhelmina Cole Holladay; Art © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

Louise Bourgeois, Spider III, 1995; Bronze, 19 x 33 x 33 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Wilhelmina Cole Holladay; Art © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

Louise Bourgeois (b. 1911, Paris; d. 2010, New York City)
Spider III, 1995
Bronze, 19 x 33 x 33 in.
Gift of Wilhelmina Cole Holladay
The spider is Bourgeois’s most famous motif. The resurgence of the spider in sculptures from the mid-1990s attests to the primacy of this creature in the artist’s imagination as well as her obsessive interest in the nature of the maternal experience. Bourgeois associated the spider with protectiveness and frequently remarked that her mother, Joséphine, shared spiders’ admirable attributes: patience, industriousness and cleverness. In a 2007 interview, she stated, “My works are portraits of a relationship, and the most important one was my mother.”

Although Bourgeois perceived a protective, nurturing quality in spiders, she understood that they can evoke a fearful response in others. The cast-bronze medium allowed her to create a rough surface texture that gives this spider a dynamic, pulsating quality that captures arachnids’ characteristic skittering motion.

Yael Bartana, What if Women Ruled the World, 2016; Neon, 98 1/2 x 38 1/2 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts; Museum purchase, Belinda de Gaudemar Acquisition Fund, with additional support from the Members’ Acquisition Fund.

Yael Bartana, What if Women Ruled the World, 2016; Neon, 98 1/2 x 38 1/2 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts; Museum purchase, Belinda de Gaudemar Acquisition Fund, with additional support from the Members’ Acquisition Fund.

Yael Bartana (b. 1970, Kfar Yehezkel, Israel)
What if Women Ruled the World, 2016
Neon, 98 1/2 x 38 1/2 in.
Museum purchase, Belinda de Gaudemar Acquisition Fund, with additional support from the Members’ Acquisition Fund
This neon sculpture is related to Bartana’s current film and performance project What if Women Ruled the World. Extending the ending of Stanley Kubrick’s film Dr. Strangelove (1964), which proposed a new realm in which women outnumber men by a ratio of 10:1, Bartana imagines a culture where women seek solutions to humanity’s most urgent problems. While the sculpture is emblematic of this alternative world, its resonance with current public discourse is powerful.

Bartana’s work spans video, photography and installation. She often appropriates raw documentary materials and blends these with fictional elements. She represented Poland at the 2011 Venice Biennale with an installation of three films that followed a movement to repopulate Jews in Poland.

Lalla Essaydi, Bullets Revisited #3, 2012; Three chromogenic prints mounted on aluminum, 66 x 150 in. overall; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Purchased with funds provided by Jacqueline Badger Mars, Sunny Scully Alsup and William Alsup, Mr. Sharad Tak and Mrs. Mahinder Tak, Marcia and Frank Carlucci, and Nancy Nelson Stevenson; © Lalla Essaydi.

Lalla Essaydi, Bullets Revisited #3, 2012; Three chromogenic prints mounted on aluminum, 66 x 150 in. overall; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Purchased with funds provided by Jacqueline Badger Mars, Sunny Scully Alsup and William Alsup, Mr. Sharad Tak and Mrs. Mahinder Tak, Marcia and Frank Carlucci, and Nancy Nelson Stevenson; © Lalla Essaydi.

Lalla Essaydi (b. 1956, Marrakesh)
Bullets Revisited #3, 2012
Three chromogenic prints mounted to aluminum, 60 x 48 in. (each panel)
Purchased with funds provided by Jacqueline Badger Mars, Sunny Scully Alsup and William Alsup, Mr. Sharad Tak and Mrs. Mahinder Tak, Marcia and Frank Carlucci, and Nancy Nelson Stevenson
Essaydi’s photography reflects an iconography that stretches as far back as the Orientalist imagery of 19th-century artists. Her female figures often are enveloped in Islamic calligraphy applied in henna, which adorns their skin and garments. In Bullets Revisited #3, the elaborate decorative patterns that cover and surround the figure’s body are composed of silver and golden-colored bullet casings that evoke symbolic violence and refer to Essaydi’s fear about growing restrictions on women in a new post-revolutionary era following the Arab Spring.

With multi-layered references to cultural, social and political identities, this triptych is also self-reflexive about the medium itself. The uncropped film borders allude to the artifice of photography and emphasize its ability to create false realities.

National Museum of Women in the Arts Founder Wilhelmina Cole Holladay standing near Berthe Morisot, Jeune Femme en Mauve (Young Woman in Mauve), 1880; Oil on canvas, 28 x 23 in.; Gift of Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long; Photo © 2017 Margot Schulman.

National Museum of Women in the Arts Founder Wilhelmina Cole Holladay standing near Berthe Morisot, Jeune Femme en Mauve (Young Woman in Mauve), 1880; Oil on canvas, 28 x 23 in.; Gift of Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long; Photo © 2017 Margot Schulman.

Berthe Morisot (b. 1841, Bourges, France; d. 1895, Paris)
Jeune Femme en Mauve (Young Woman in Mauve), 1880
Oil on canvas, 28 x 23 in.
Gift of Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long
Berthe Morisot was one of two women artists who regularly exhibited with the Impressionists in Paris in the 1870s and 1880s. Many of the artist’s best-known works depict individual women, and Jeune Femme en Mauve (Young Woman in Mauve) is one of Morisot’s characteristic and distinguished works of art.

Although she often relied on friends and family members as sitters, Morisot did not intend her paintings to be interpreted as portraits. Her images offer a glimpse into the daily lives of upper-middle-class French women and are expressive studies of color and light.

Jami Porter Lara, MHB-6SBR-0916CE-01, 2016; Wood-fired clay, 10 x 6 1/2 in. diameter; Museum purchase: Members’ Acquisition Fund; Photo by Addison Doty.

Jami Porter Lara, MHB-6SBR-0916CE-01, 2016; Wood-fired clay, 10 x 6 1/2 in. diameter; Museum purchase: Members’ Acquisition Fund; Photo by Addison Doty.

Jami Porter Lara (b. 1969, Spokane, Washington)
LDS-MHR-2LBR-0216CE-06, 2016
MHB-6SBR-0916CE-01, 2016
LDS-MHB-LPBR-0916CE-03, 2016
LDS-MHB-WVBR-0617CE-09, 2017
Wood-fired clay, dimensions variable
Museum purchase: Members’ Acquisition Fund
Jami Porter Lara refers to her works as “contemporary artifacts,” in which she combines the shape of the contemporary plastic bottle with ancient ceramic techniques. These vessels are hand-built using the coiling method of pottery production. After the clay vessels dry, Porter Lara burnishes them with a flat stone to achieve a high sheen. Then, she fires them in an outdoor pit. During this “reduction” process, flames and oxygen are kept away from the pottery, causing the clay bodies to turn black.

Porter Lara’s forms are at once familiar and enigmatic. They retain stylistic elements of the plastic bottle, but their complexity evokes symbolic or ritualistic objects. This ambiguity heightens the connection between these contemporary works and relics of the past. It also prompts the viewer to question assumptions about cultural distinctions between art and artifact. Many of Porter Lara’s works were featured in the recent NMWA exhibition Border Crossing: Jami Porter Lara.

Faith Ringgold, American Collection #4: Jo Baker's Bananas, 1997; Acrylic on canvas with pieced fabric border, 80 1/2 x 76 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Purchased with funds donated by the Estate of Barbara Bingham Moore, Olga V. Hargis Family Trusts and the Members’ Acquisition Fund; Photo by Lee Stalsworth.

Faith Ringgold, American Collection #4: Jo Baker’s Bananas, 1997; Acrylic on canvas with pieced fabric border, 80 1/2 x 76 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Purchased with funds donated by the Estate of Barbara Bingham Moore, Olga V. Hargis Family Trusts and the Members’ Acquisition Fund; Photo by Lee Stalsworth.

Faith Ringgold (b. 1930, New York City)
American Collection #4: Jo Baker’s Bananas, 1997
Acrylic on canvas with pieced fabric border, 80 1/2 x 76 in.
Purchased with funds donated by the Estate of Barbara Bingham Moore, Olga V. Hargis Family Trusts and the Members’ Acquisition Fund
Faith Ringgold is well known for originating the African American story quilt revival in the late 1970s. In combining the “high” art practice of painting with the “craft” of quilt-making, Ringgold creates objects that defy stereotypical categorization. Ringgold’s quilts fuse together textiles—traditionally the domain of women—with painting on canvas. In this way, Ringgold’s narrative works are a reflection of the traditions of her own family, such as sewing, which she learned from her mother, as well as of larger African American cultural traditions.

Often, Ringgold’s stories are told over multiple quilts; Jo Baker’s Bananas is from one of these series, The American Collection. In this story quilt, Ringgold depicts the famous African American dancer Josephine Baker (1906–1975), who became a stage legend in France, where she lived most of her life. Baker’s figure is represented five times across the top of the quilt, implying a sense of movement across a stage. The so-called “Banana Dance” that she performed in 1926 at Paris’s Folies Bergère music hall cemented her fame. Offstage, Baker supported the burgeoning Civil Rights movement in the United States and used her fame and fortune to bolster support for the cause.

(via National Museum of Women in the Arts.)

ECA Art News Briefs
Project Create Announces Vaughan Bradley-Willemann as Program Manager for Community Programs & Partnerships

Project Create Announces Vaughan Bradley-Willemann as Program Manager for Community Programs & Partnerships

Interview by Beatriz Lorencatto, Project Create Intern

Vaughan, when did you get started as an artist, and what is your personal artistic practice?
I started expressing myself musically at a very young age. I was raised by two opera singer parents, and was told that my mom performed multiple times while she was pregnant with me. I started playing the violin when I was three, wanting to follow in my older sister’s footsteps who also played. Growing up I was always more interested in extracurricular than academics, so I (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
Strauss Artist Grants Honor Three Remarkable Artists Working in Public Art, Painting, and Theater Design

Strauss Artist Grants Honor Three Remarkable Artists Working in Public Art, Painting, and Theater Design

The Arts Council of Fairfax County announces three $5,000 Strauss Artist Grants awards to Mount Vernon-based visual artist Linda Hesh, Mason-based painter Scott Hutchison, and Mason-based theatre designer Margaret (Margie) Jervis.

“The Arts Council is honored to recognize and champion these three superlative individual artists,” said Linda S. Sullivan, President and CEO of the Arts Council of Fairfax County. “The Strauss Artist Grant is open to artists of all disciplines residing in Fairfax County, and this year’s recipients were selected from a group of nearly 30 highly qualified artists.”

Linda Hesh’s art explores human connections, concentrating on (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
Dance Place Announces New Executive Artistic Director Christopher K. Morgan

Dance Place Announces New Executive Artistic Director Christopher K. Morgan

The Dance Place Board of Directors is delighted to announce Christopher K. Morgan as Dance Place’s new Executive Artistic Director starting September 1, 2017. Christopher takes on his new role at Dance Place as a natural progression from his career as an award-winning choreographer, community leader and advocate for diversity in the arts. Morgan leads a new chapter in Dance Place’s history to (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
Smithsonian American Art Museum Selects FreelandBuck Design for Site-Specific Installation in Renwick Gallery’s Grand Salon

Smithsonian American Art Museum Selects FreelandBuck Design for Site-Specific Installation in Renwick Gallery’s Grand Salon

The Smithsonian American Art Museum has selected FreelandBuck, an architectural design practice based in New York and Los Angeles, to create a site-specific installation for the Bettie Rubenstein Grand Salon at its Renwick Gallery. The installation, titled Parallax Gap, is an immersive, ceiling-suspended structure exploring the interplay between architectural design, fabrication and representation.

Parallax Gap will be on view at the Renwick Gallery from July 1 to Feb. 11, 2018. Independent curator Helen B. Bechtel coordinated the installation.

“The way in which FreelandBuck dissolves (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities awards $1.7 million in grants in the third quarter of FY 2017

DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities awards $1.7 million in grants in the third quarter of FY 2017

The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Board of Commissioners recently approved $1.73 million in grant awards to District-based individuals and organizations to support arts and humanities projects taking place between now and September 30, 2017.

The grant announcements come as part of innoMAYtion, Mayor Bowser’s month-long initiative showcasing how ideas from local entrepreneurs and innovators are making the (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
District of Columbia Leads the Region in Arts and Culture Employment

District of Columbia Leads the Region in Arts and Culture Employment

DC residents involved in the arts and cultural production sector were compensated more than $6.88 billion in 2014, according to a new study released recently through a collaboration of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA).

Over 51,000 DC residents were employed in the arts and cultural sector in 2014, representing (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
2017 Creative Aging Festival Brings Over 60 Arts Activities to Fairfax Senior and Community Centers

2017 Creative Aging Festival Brings Over 60 Arts Activities to Fairfax Senior and Community Centers

The Arts Council of Fairfax County is delighted to partner with Fairfax County for the 2017 Creative Aging Festival during the month of May, coinciding with Older Americans Month. The Creative Aging Festival celebrates older adults’ participation in the arts across Fairfax County through visual, music, theatre, dance, literary, and culinary arts activities.

Over sixty free, interactive events are planned (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
CulturalDC Announces Ava LaTanya Hilton To Serve As Permanent Executive Director

CulturalDC Announces Ava LaTanya Hilton To Serve As Permanent Executive Director

The Board of Directors of CulturalDC  announces that Ava LaTanya “Tanya” Hilton will serve as the permanent executive director of CulturalDC. This selection concludes the Board’s year-long search for the replacement for previous executive director, Juanita Hardy. Hilton has served as interim executive director for the past year and is excited to continue her leadership of CulturalDC. (more…)

ECA Art News Briefs
Accomplished Teaching Artists Introduce Students to Urban Storytelling, Cultural Landscape Painting, and Blues Music

Accomplished Teaching Artists Introduce Students to Urban Storytelling, Cultural Landscape Painting, and Blues Music

The Arts Council of Fairfax County has placed three Fairfax artists at middle schools throughout Fairfax County as a part of the Artist Residency Program. The artists are connecting theatre, visual art and music with the core study areas of language arts, civics, social studies and creative writing to offer students engaging, unique and innovative learning experiences.

  • Playwright, director, actress, and educator Helen Murray Pafumi engaged Key Middle School drama students in “Urban Storytelling: What I Wish I’d Said.” Her residency promoted empathy and self-realization through theatre writing and performance with cross-curricular connections to language arts and civics.
  • Award-winning landscape, portrait, and en plein air artist and teacher Michela Mansuino’s residency, “Cultural Landscape: Past, Present, and Future” at Kilmer Middle School is investigating how visual art communicates a sense of time and place with cross-curricular connections to social studies.
  • Multi-instrumentalist, roots musician and arts integration educator Curtis “Mr. Blues” Mailloux will conduct his artist residency “You Can Write a Blues Song!” at Glasgow Middle School later this spring. He will use songwriting in the American blues styles to integrate music, social studies and creative writing.

(more…)

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#5WomenArtists Campaign: 520 Organizations from 7 Continents & 30 Countries Participated

#5WomenArtists Campaign: 520 Organizations from 7 Continents & 30 Countries Participated

#5WomenArtists campaign is rousing success in raising awareness of gender equity in the arts and promoting women artists National Museum of Women in the Arts reports record-breaking engagement in its second-year social media campaign for Women’s History Month.

520 national and international cultural institutions from seven continents and 30 countries participated in (more…)

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Life Pieces to Masterpieces Announces New Executive Director

Life Pieces to Masterpieces Announces New Executive Director

The Board of Directors of Life Pieces to Masterpieces (LPTM) and the entire LPTM family announce that Joy King-Pike has been appointed as the new Executive Director, effective March 1, 2017.

Joy will help to launch a new chapter in Life Pieces’ stellar 20-year history of serving African American boys and young men, ages 3 to 25, in Washington’s Wards 7 and 8. She joins forces with (more…)

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