Gallery Openings and Events

Fall 2017 Exhibitions at American University Museum

Photo courtesy of American University Museum.

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Opening Reception: Saturday, September 9 from 6pm to 9pm
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BETWEEN TWO ROUNDS OF FIRE, THE EXILE OF THE SEA: Arab Modern and Contemporary Works from the Barjeel Art Foundation Curated by Karim Sultan
September 5–December 17, 2017
This exhibition draws on a diverse selection of works from the collection of the Barjeel Art Foundation, United Arab Emirates, that illustrate an array of technologies of conflict. Conflict is de ned in a wider sense, taking place on either a sociological or psychological plane, through assertions of language, between histories or between peoples, and the body itself as a site of conflict. This exhibition also explores mechanisms of power, and the power of artists to recognize and employ these mechanisms to directly address the issues of conflict, or more abstractly, notions of space, language, memory, geography, categorization, and identification that are part of conflict.

Photo courtesy of American University Museum.

I AM
An East-West Arts Initiative Organized by CARAVAN Curated by Janet Rady
September 5–October 22, 2017
I AM is a strategic peacebuilding exhibition organized by CARAVAN that showcases the insights and experiences of Middle Eastern women as they confront issues of culture, religion and social reality in a rapidly changing world both in the Middle East and West. It addresses today’s critical and increasing need of creating respect, developing understanding and encouraging friendship between the Middle East and West.

Photo courtesy of American University Museum.

TWIST—LAYER—POUR
Sondra N. Arkin, Joan Belmar, Mary Early Curated by Sarah Tanguy
September 5–October 22, 2017
In Twist – Layer – Pour, the unexpected grouping of Sondra N. Arkin, Joan Belmar, and Mary Early yields a dynamic, site-responsive meditation on systemized components and accumulated wholes. Step by step, link by link, their obsessive object making becomes a metaphor for conscious and intuitive gesture, relational interconnectivity, and the passage of time. At once public and private, monumental and intimate, the works profess an unswerving passion for their chosen materials: steel wire, synthetic papers, and beeswax. Individual variances and details invite close attention while in the aggregate, distilled shapes and rhythmic patterns emerge.

Photo courtesy of American University Museum.

Alper Initiative for Washington Art
MAKING A SCENE: JEFFERSON PLACE GALLERY Curated by John Anderson
September 5–October 22, 2017
Making a Scene marks the 60th anniversary of the opening of the Jefferson Place Gallery: a small cooperative gallery dedicated principally to showing the work of DC-area contemporary artists of the late 1950s. Founded by four American University professors and Alice Denney, the gallery would quickly evolve from extension of AU faculty’s pedagogy, to an early supporter of the Washington Color School, to a host of exhibitions featuring prominent national and international contemporary art figures including Jack Tworkov, Robert Goodnough, Toko Shinoda, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jasper Johns.

Photo courtesy of American University Museum.

WILLIAM WOODWARD: THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS
September 5–December 17, 2017
For the past two decades, William Woodward has delved into the rich history and aesthetic possibilities of the Seven Deadly Sins. The master drawings and narrative paintings in this exhibition owe a great deal to the films of Federico Fellini, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton the commedia dell’arte tradition. The artist tries to imagine, had these directors and actors been painters, how they might have depicted their subjects in whimsical and elusive ways rather than strident and explicit interpretations. In creating The Seven Deadly Sins Woodward is not preaching about sin. Rather, he wanted to paint pictures that no one, including himself, had ever seen before.

Photo courtesy of American University Museum.

TETHERED TO THE CRADLE: KINETIC WORK BY CHRISTOPHER CARTER
September 5–December 17, 2017
Christopher Carter’s substantial and important sculptures are intended to invite viewer interaction, re flection and contemplation. The ready-made forms draw on Carter’s experiences and memories of his adolescence for their inspiration. The individual pieces comprising the totality of the work resonate and interact with each other, suggesting viewers reflect on the weight and meaning of their own experience of growing up.

Center Hours:

  • Tuesday through Sunday: 11am to 4pm

The Katzen Arts Center located at 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW. For more information, call 202-885-1300.