Artist Talks Gallery Openings and Events

Washington Studio School Presents Brian Kelley

Photo courtesy of Washington Studio School.

Photo courtesy of Washington Studio School.

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Opening Reception: Friday, April 7 from 6pm to 8pm

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Artist Talk: Friday, April 7 at 7pm

Washington Studio School (WSS) is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings, prints, and drawings by faculty member Brian Kelley.

Brian considers himself a problematic figurative painter, because most of his work is neither paintings nor figurative. He approaches painting, painting, drawing, printmaking, and any other media as extensions of a painting practice that is based on direct observation.

Brian uses different mediums and techniques as a way to keep the mark-making spontaneous and considered. Although many of his works have no people present, yet the cities, buildings, interiors, and still life objects founds in his work are about the durable ways people’s lives influence the world around them.

Brian lives in Alexandria, Virginia. He has an MFA in Painting from Indiana University and a BA from the College of William and Mary. He has exhibited nationally and lectured at several schools, including George Washington University, the College of William and Mary, George Mason University, Anne Arundel Community College, Prince George’s Community College, Northern Virginia Community College, and the Washington Studio School. His portfolio includes works in painting, drawing, print- making, and video.

BIO
Brian Kelley lives in Alexandria, Virginia. He has an MFA in Painting from Indiana University and a BA from the College of William and Mary. He has exhibited nationally and lectured at several schools, including George Washington University, the College of William and Mary, George Mason University, Anne Arundel Community College, Prince George’s Community College, Northern Virginia Community College, and the Washington Studio School. His portfolio includes works in painting, drawing, printmaking, and video

ARTIST STATEMENT
I consider myself a problematic figurative painter, both because a good deal of my work is not painting and because the human figure is often missing. First, I approach painting, drawing, printmaking, and any other media as extensions of a painting practice that comes from working from direct observation. I try to not cultivate separate ways of working in different mediums, but use different mediums and techniques as a way to keep the mark-making spontaneous and considered. Second, in works that have no people present, the subject is still people, but by proxy. The cities, buildings, interiors, and still life objects in my work are always a way of thinking about the durable ways human action shapes the world.

The world I view daily is one touched and retouched by people.  In a place like Alexandria or Washington, there are no remaining primeval trees or wildness.  Even the local contemporary push to replant native species is a very deliberate human action that paradoxically hopes to be somewhat wild.  Cracks in walls, and perhaps even more importantly their slipshod or expert repairs, reveal that a building is not an inorganic structure, but something much more like a bee’s hive marked by each successive group of inhabitants.  I am particularly fortunate to once again be exhibiting a solo exhibition in a building that has had several past lives.*  I enjoy this kind of double layer of human touch and activity:  the first being the motif of places shaped by people and the second being the act of working by hand and direct observation on a composition.

Washington Studio School is located at 2129 S. St. NW. For more information, call 202.258.5404 or visit www.washingtonstudioschool.org.

Editorial Team
Authored by: Editorial Team

Post provided by the East City Art Editorial Team.