Profiles

New Development in the Gateway Arts District Finds Inspiration in the Local Arts Community

In Prince George’s County’s Gateway Arts District, Studio 3807 is embracing the vibrant local arts community.

Walking into the leasing center on Saturday December 9th, you could immediately sense the excitement of the agents, artists, and community in the shared space. There was optimism and spirit from both developers and visual artists involved in the Studio 3807 project. The upscale apartment community will consist of 147 apartment homes and 6,322 square feet of retail space. In addition 3,000 square feet are set aside for 5 artist studio spaces and a gallery which will be called Portico. The projected opening date is June 2018.

Rendering of the future Studio 3807 located at 3807 Rhode Island Avenue in Brentwood, MD. Image Credit: Landex Development.

While thinking through the plans for the property, Peter Siegel, CEO of Landex Development, focused on creating a “free-flow of everything between building and community.” The intention was to create a building that reflects and gives back to the artistic community, while also allowing residents to feel like there is a special experience in their new apartments. The goal of the building in and of itself is to coexist with the community in harmony, creating a fluid environment that is interconnected in multiple ways. In organizing and planning the development, Siegel wanted to ensure that the primary focus and impact, in accordance with the mission of the Gateway Arts District, was to promote economic development through the arts.

Artist studio example. Photo by Ashley Shah for East City Art.

When first taking on this project, Siegel was introduced to John Paradiso, an accomplished local artist who ultimately became the Lead Art Consultant for Studio 3807. As his title suggests, Paradiso was crucial in introducing Siegel to a number of other local artists and in selecting the permanent installations. In staying true to the goal of the development, Siegel and Paradiso selected art that both spoke about Studio 3807 as a building, and also designed the building in a way that spoke about the artists. There will be 17 different art works valued at $200,000 in the common areas, including work from artists such as Valerie Theberge, Jay Coleman, Melissa Glasser and Allen Linder.

Melissa Glasser, Whale Web, 2016, Acrylic on wood, 36” x 48”. Image courtesy of the artist.

By keeping a permanent collection within the building, residents will live with the art and interact with the artists that are showcasing their work. It allows for residents who may be newer to the neighborhood or unfamiliar with the Gateway Arts District to better understand the community and its charm. As Siegel put it, “if you didn’t have the artists here, it’d be a nice place. But there is something really energetic and dynamic about having the artists here with you.” Paradiso and Siegel are currently programming various artist and author talks that will be available to residents and the public when Portico opens in mid-2018.

Additionally, during the course of our interview, Siegel shared his plans for Studio 3807’s sister property—Artisan 4100. Just as Landex Development is using Studio 3807 to collaborate with the visual arts community, he hopes to promote the same sort of engagement with musicians in Artisan 4100. The idea is to develop another mix use property that contains musical studio space. Peter and his team are thinking creatively about how they can utilize mix use spaces that allow local expression and an affordable option for artists and musicians to cultivate their trade.

For more information about Studio 3807 and the permanent art installations, visit Studio 3807’s website at:
www.studio3807.com

Ashley Shah
Authored by: Ashley Shah

Ashley Shah is a freelance writer based in the Columbia Heights neighborhood in Washington, DC. She has a BA in Art History from UVa and is always looking for ways to explore the arts around the city. Ashley has also volunteered with organizations in DC such as the Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery and Dupont Underground.