Art Enables Hosts a Virtual Talk with Aaron Maier-Carretero

By Editorial Team on June 7, 2021
Copyright © 2021 Art Enables, All rights reserved.
Talk: Tuesday, June 8 at 5:30pm

Join Art Enables and visiting artist Aaron Maier-Carretero on June 8 at 5:30 p.m. EDT  for a virtual gallery tour + talk highlighting our current exhibition, “Actually, I’m from the suburbs; I just say DC because it’s easier.”

With work by Maier-Carretero and Art Enables resident artists Michael Haynes, Paul Lewis, Raymond Lewis, Max Poznerzon, and Nonja Tiller, this full-gallery installation simulates the interior and exterior of a suburban family home formed from a collage of physical objects and illustrated elements. Actual pieces of furniture co-exist with household items drawn on paper or directly on the flat surfaces of the floor and walls. Maier-Carretero’s paintings on canvas present multifaceted scenes of domestic life along with works on paper by Art Enables artists that stand in for family photos and other household ephemera. Spaces and divisions are concrete and illusory – indicated alternately by actual walls, suggestions rendered in graphite lines, and even our own memories and expectations.

Guests will have an opportunity to join the discussion and ask questions. Free to attend, RSVP required.

RSVP now to join us Tuesday, June 8 at 5:30 p.m. EDT → 

About “Actually, I’m from the suburbs…”

In casual conversation, claiming a well-known city as your hometown rather than one of its suburbs can be more expedient than the granular truth. It can also imply the discomfort of being associated with a generic place, the notion of it being “easier to explain,” almost an apology for a small lie. Aaron Maier-Carretero is interested in these subtleties. His experience growing up was shaped around the idea that the “American dream” was built in the suburbs. To hold on to that dream, one had to embrace both its pleasantries and a more insidious culture shaped by whiteness and patriarchy: protecting and reinforcing racism and gender roles, hiding violence and erasing or tokenizing other cultures.

The private spaces of suburban homes can shelter both familial love and the dysfunction and violence of individual families and society at large. In Maier-Carretero’s work, moments of tenderness co-exist with tension and unease. In “Waltzing with Bears,” a father holds his young son in his arms, singing sweetly to him in the darkness of a child’s bedroom. In sharp contrast, bright light from the hallway illuminates the bedroom door, where two indentations have been punched into its surface. For Maier-Carretero, these complexities are inherently and compellingly human. The latent and overt expressions of value in the places we live – both positive and negative – form stories that transcend the suburban landscape and speak to a broader American experience.

This installation invites viewers to explore a family home formed from a collage of physical objects and illustrated elements by Maier-Carretero and Art Enables resident artists Michael Haynes, Paul Lewis, Raymond Lewis, Max Poznerzon, and Nonja Tiller. Actual pieces of furniture co-exist with household items drawn on paper or directly on the flat surfaces of the floor and walls. Maier-Carretero’s paintings on canvas present multifaceted scenes of domestic life along with works on paper by Art Enables artists that stand in for family photos and other household ephemera. Spaces and divisions are concrete and illusory – indicated alternately by actual walls, suggestions rendered in graphite lines, and even our own memories and expectations.