Artist Talks

January 2020 Exhibitions at IA&A at Hillyer

Courtesy of Noel Kassewitz.

Artist Talks: Tuesday, January at 6:30pm

Hillyer presents three new exhibitions featuring Tessa Click, Neil Forrest, and Noel Kassewitz. Click’s Search Party for Two seeks understanding of the real world by using absurd characters, props, and settings as proxy. Forrest’s work incorporates imagery from architecture and historical events that reference national and cultural identities; in The Washingtonian Service Forrest reinterprets the MLK library as a porcelain colosseum on collision with a celestial object with this contested landmark, forecasting a cosmic problem as much as an existential one. Kassewitz’s Rococo Remastered examines how a painter copes with a rapidly changing cultural and environmental landscape through the lens of art history where she delves into the historical clues left to us by the pastel colored art movement that preceded France’s revolution and reinterprets the works through the lens of Miami pool party culture for today’s audience.

Courtesy of Tessa Click.

Tessa Click (Washington, DC), Search Party for Two
Based in symbolic language, this body of work seeks understanding of the real world by using absurd characters, props, and settings as proxy. Intertwined with otherworldly imagery, mundane scenes set the stage for playing out unseen connections between internal and external conflicts. In Click’s Search Party for Two, these mixed-media paintings and structures invite the viewer to consider concepts of potentiality and agency in uncertain times.

Originally from Carmel, IN, Tessa Click received a Master of Fine Arts from Lesley University in Cambridge, MA and a Bachelor of Science from Ball State University. Click relocated to Washington, DC in 2012 where she currently lives and works.

Courtesy of Neil Forrest.

Neil Forrest (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada), The Washingtonian Service
Neil Forrest’s works examine historical events, architectural monuments, and national identities, and uses the lens of ceramic history to play out corporeal and material elements of storytelling.  The installations aspire to a logos of craft, site, and knowledge. Forrest’s The Washingtonian Service is a colosseum, a collision and a suite of celestial objects that meet in DC.  The colosseum appears as the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library and is emblematic of a golden age in a salient city. The real MLK Library, soon to be re-incarnated and re-inhabited, was a city’s search for modern identity in architectural form. Admired by an elite but perhaps unloved by many, architect Mies van der Rohe’s library is itself a story-line in Washington. Forrest’s rendition of this icon as a porcelain model is both a fascination with miniatures and a flirtation with great centerpieces such as Napoleon’s commissioned Egyptian Service. If Napoleon used a porcelain miniature to glorify his expeditionary force in Egypt, The Washingtonian Service instead hosts the rare chance of a collision between a celestial object with a contested landmark, forecasting a cosmic problem as much as an existential one.

Neil Forrest is an artist and professor at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax, Canada and taught at the Oslo National Academy of the Arts in Norway. He has exhibited at the Denver Art Museum, the Museum Hilversum in The Netherlands, the Cheongju Biennale in Korea, and has received Established Artist’s grants from the Canada Council and the Norwegian Artistic Research Council.

Courtesy of Noel Kassewitz.

Noel Kassewitz (Washington, DC), Rococo Remastered
Noel Kassewitz’s practice examines how a painter copes with a rapidly changing cultural and environmental landscape. Using experimental techniques that blur the line between painting and sculpture, passive and active object, cultural artifact and survival tool, she works to examine this moment in time through the lens of art history, rising social pressures, and commodified disaster preparedness. In her latest body of work, Rococo Remastered, she delves into the historical clues left to us by the pastel colored art movement that preceded France’s revolution and reinterprets the works through the lens of Miami pool party culture for today’s audience.

Noel Kassewitz was born and raised in Miami, Florida. Her works have exhibited nationally in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, and Miami, as well as internationally in Milan and Bologna, Italy. She currently resides in Washington, DC.

Gallery Hours:

  • Tuesday-Friday: 12pm to 6pm
  • Saturday-Monday: 12pm to 5pm
  • and by appointment

IA&A at Hillyer is located at 9 Hillyer Ct. NW. For more information, visit http://athillyer.org.

Editorial Team
Authored by: Editorial Team

Post provided by the East City Art Editorial Team.