Posts by Eric Celarier

Eric Celarier was born, lives, and works in the Washington DC Metropolitan Area. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Maryland in 1991 and his Master’s in Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati in 1997. His work has developed the theme of biological evolution associated with human impact, exploiting garbage as a metaphor, Celarier assembles sculptures and prints from everyday casteoffs, calling attention to earth’s history of radical, biological change, change that seems to coincide with dramatic environmental shifts. He is an artist, educator, reviewer, and curator. His most immediate activities include hosting the Becoming a Professional in the Art World Series online program for Washington’s Sculptors Group and participating in numerous solo and group exhibitions in the region.

By Eric Celarier on August 2, 2022

East City Art Reviews—Hamiltonian Artists Unexpected Occurrences at The Kreeger Museum

Through the Kreeger Museum’s Collaborative program, Director Helen Chason has partnered with local collectives like the Nicholson Project and currently with Hamiltonian Artists to commingle new art with the museum’s celebrated precursors. Curated by Tomora Wright, Fellowship Director of Hamiltonian Artists the most recent iteration of this initiative, titled Unexpected Occurrences, integrates the Kreeger’s panoply of historical treasures with works from a new generation of ambitious practitioners.

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By Eric Celarier on July 18, 2022

East City Art Reviews—Charma Le Edmonds Untold Stories

Untold Stories, on view at Popcorn Gallery in Glen Echo Park, features a group of paintings by Charma Le Edmonds, the final output of an esteemed figure in the Washington DC area art scene. Tragically taken from us in a car accident a little over a year ago, Edmonds’ was...

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By Eric Celarier on June 2, 2022

East City Art Reviews—Mary Early Līnea Studies

Mary Early’s exhibition Līnea Studies asks viewers to reconsider the front interior of the Dupont Circle row house that comprises Gallery 2112. The highlight of the show is Early’s sculpture of suspended beeswax rods, Līnea XII, which not only commands interest unto itself, but also opens up many possibilities for the Victorian parlor in which it is placed.

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By Eric Celarier on May 10, 2022

East City Art Reviews— Sarah J. Hull Taxonomy of Evanescence

Taxonomy of Evanescence presents different layers of an artist’s life for us to explore. Emanating from her internal sense of how the world is organized, Sarah Hull reveals her intentions with clarity, while reserving enough latitude for the observer to make personal connections to them.    

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By Eric Celarier on April 25, 2022

East City Art Reviews—SUSPENDED INTER-SPACES at VisArts

SUSPENDED INTERS-SPACES is an exhibition about the artistic process. Though originally developed to examine these practices generically, as artists found themselves isolated and enveloped in the sorrow and social unrest of the pandemic, they reacted to the context in which they were creating to reflect what they were perceiving the state of the world to be. Instead of business as usual, they inevitably gravitated to larger questions of existential importance, reporting their findings through repetition, myth, ritual, intuition, and metaphor.

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By Eric Celarier on April 3, 2022

East City Art Reviews—Resilience and Uncertainty

Resilience and Uncertainty gives voice to messages of uneasiness, hope, and survival. As curator, Valdez sees these artists finding ways to use adversity to their advantage. Locating truths in the chaos of the psychological and social disaster brought about by the pandemic, this group has been able to work through and even discover hidden meaning in the unpredictability of the world; a world that is far less stable than we once thought.

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By Eric Celarier on February 15, 2022

East City Art Reviews—Joseph Shetler In Pursuit of Nothing

If you quickly go through Joseph Shetler’s show, In Pursuit of Nothing, at southwest Washington’s Culture House DC, you will miss what it achieves. His latest installment of arrangements of horizontal and vertical lines appears so simple that their underlying complexity could easily be missed by a casual viewer.

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By Eric Celarier on December 13, 2021

East City Art Reviews—Jean Sausele-Knodt Recent Animations

Jean Sausele-Knodt’s collection of dynamic assemblages, Recent Animations at Fred Schnider Gallery of Art, creates amalgamations of hand-cut pieces of wood, concrete, steel, and embroidery that bind disparate elements into dynamic arrangements. Intensely personal, these works make sense of the fragmentation she sees in the world.

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By Eric Celarier on November 2, 2021

East City Art Reviews—Wayson R. Jones In Shades

In Wayson R. Jones’ current exhibit In Shades at Portico Gallery, the artist documents the most recent chapters in his study of value. There is something fundamental about black and white media, making it especially appropriate for describing foundational truths.

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By Eric Celarier on October 6, 2020

East City Art Reviews—Trevor Young: Seeing in the Dark

Trevor Young’s current exhibition, Seeing in the Dark, on view at Addison/Ripley Fine Art, updates his series of dark, dusk, and dawn vignettes of seemingly abandoned landscapes. Unpretentious in its delivery and its subject matter, Young presents us with gas stations, overpasses, and billboards that appear in the still night air, reminding us of the constructed world we live in.

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By Eric Celarier on January 15, 2020

East City Art Reviews—Meditations and Epiphanies

Curated by Kayleigh Bryant-Greenwell, the Betty Mae Kramer Gallery & Music Room of downtown Silver Spring hosts artists who describe the metaphysical with paint. Though ineffable and intangible, Judith Benderson, J. Jordan Bruns, Kelly Posey, and Terry Sitz bring various visions of those things that might only be felt. With bright colors and subtle textures, these artists seek to describe the indefinable nature of human experience through abstraction.

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