Spring Exhibitions at Hill Center Galleries

By Editorial Team on May 7, 2018
Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.
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Opening Reception: Wednesday, May 9 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm
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Hill Center Galleries announces the opening of six new exhibitions that will run from May 3-June 23, 2018. In addition, the Galleries will also see the installation of Philip Livingston’s A Natural History of Washington, DC, in Hill Center’s Lincoln Hall. The Opening Reception with the Artists will be Wednesday, May 9, from 6:30-8:30 pm. Philip Livingston will give an artist talk on his piece A Natural History of Washington, DC at 8 pm during the reception.

The artist words presented below are their own words.

Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.

Philip Livingston: A Natural History of Washington, DC
A Natural History of Washington DC is a visual poem using images found near, or inspired by, the Hill Center. The parts vary in scale, realism, and in their response to gravity and context. In the spirit of natural history, I am being more of an observer (I just moved to DC) than a story-teller. The central image of the tree was my starting point. Everything grew over time from this Ash on the Hill Center grounds: the fence, the clouds (of Civil War or burning neighborhoods, or just low clouds rendered in paint), the landscape along the lower edge, and the red pyramid which I think of as L’Enfant with his neo-classical plans. The cross-hatching at the top echoes 19th century illustrations, and the blue-green floating blobs are concentrations of green leaves, blue sky, sunlight and inspiration.

Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.

David Amoroso: Frida y los Machos
Paintings
David Amoroso shares portraits of two of his favorite subject matters – his friends and Mexican artist Frida Khalo. The portraits of his friends, primarily laborers, depict the subjects in an iconic light. They are based on studio photos Amoroso has taken, and the subjects are surrounded and enveloped by retro wallpaper patterns. The designs cover the subjects’ bodies as tattoos might. The portraits of Frida are based on well-known images of the artist. Although the selection of photos to work from is finite, Amoroso re-purposes the classic images to create something new and fresh.

Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.

Anthony Bremer: Rhythm of Color
Ink on Paper
I have been sketching all my life but only more recently has my work incorporated the unlimited and exhilarating rhythm of color. My preferred medium of ink on paper provides me with a wide array of choices to create repetition, patterns and bold color schemes in my drawings. Inspiration is endless and diverse with some of my drawings based on a fantastical collage of images from a dream while others place an array of objects in a room or depict the motion of a train coming down a track. Whatever the subject, its portrayal is shaped by the way my imagination captures it. I hope that my art will provoke viewers to find and question hidden meanings and encourage them to see my works from different perspectives.

Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.

Nicole Ida Fossi: Reveal/Conceal
Oil and Colored Pencil on Paper
My current figurative body of work focuses on juxtaposing bodies to explore connections. I am interested in how the interpretation of a person changes when other figures are added to the composition, and how body language and color communicate a narrative. The paintings tell real or imagined stories, in varying degrees of readability and accessibility. I am exploring what I can portray with the gaze, pose, size, and positioning of the figures against each other.

Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.

Marily Mojica: A World in Color
Paintings
Color plays a role in my psyche; it’s an important element in both my art and my life. I surround myself with color and, like a child, anything with color gets my attention immediately. It’s very apropos I use it in my work. I couldn’t live in Gotham City; the gray of the city would depress me.

Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.

Leslie M. Nolan: Flip-Side
Acrylic on Canvas
My approach to artwork involves depicting what is felt rather than what is seen. Fascinated by the complexities or ordinary people – their courage, confusion, and resilience – I reveal their vulnerability by focusing on moods, as interpreted by body language, color and gestural brushwork. Because I spent another career keeping secrets in my national security work and travel abroad for several federal agencies, my current interest is painting universal feelings, which remain largely hidden. Many of us cloak ourselves behind a veneer of success and confidence despite situations in our lives, which wreak havoc with our emotions. In these artworks I peek into inner emotions as the subjects deal with personal, economic, political and social upheaval.

Photo courtesy of Hill Center Galleries.

Dilip Sheth: Figuratively Speaking
Paintings
For the very first time of all the many art exhibits I have done in the past, I will be specifically featuring figure-drawing compositions in a series. On this series, I started off with a subject completely from my head and evolved into live models, some acquaintances and some relatives including my parents and First Lady Michelle Obama. The setting of the composition in each painting has a sense of redundancy and a tribute to my late dad who was a collector.

Gallery Hours:

  • Monday-Thursday: 8am – 7pm
  • Fridays: 8am – 6pm
  • Saturdays: 8am – 5pm
  • Sundays: 10am – 5pm

Occasional closings for special events. Please call 202-549-4172 for confirmation of open hours on a particular day.

Hill Center Galleries is located at 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. For more information, visit hillcenterdc.org/galleries.